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Selecting a Cat
Important Information When Adopting Cats
If you are interested in buying a pure-bred cat, check out the Cat Fanciers site. It contains a wealth of information about cat breeds, breeders, and breed rescues. Of course, we remind you that pure bred cats are often found at shelters, too. If you're thinking of purchasing a pure-bred kitten, please do your homework and find a responsible breeder. Do not encourage kitten mill or backyard breeders by buying from a pet store. Good breeders offer a contract spelling out the responsibilities of both the breeder and the purchaser. Most people looking for a cat just want a pet. For them, a mixed breed is often the right answer. There are many sources for acquiring a mixed breed - friends or acquaintances with an "oops" litter, answering an ad, buying from a pet store, rescuing a stray from the streets, and, of course, shelters and rescue groups.
                                
There are many more kittens born each year than there are good homes, so we urge you to stay away from pet stores unless they, themselves, are rescuing homeless kittens. Ask where the kittens came from and make sure they weren't bred to be sold. Many stores invite shelters or rescue groups to bring in pets for adoption, and several in our area will take in a rescue litter to try to find good homes. If you're helping out by taking a kitten from an accidentally bred litter, encourage the owner to get the mother cat spayed.
                               
Find out more for choosing a cat.
                              
Rescue Groups & Shelters
Adopting from a shelter or rescue group has several advantages. First and foremost, you are saving a life. A responsible shelter or rescue group will carefully screen adopters. They will have you sign a contract, stating the obligations of both the shelter and the adopter. They will require that the pet be spayed or neutered. They will take the cat back if the adoption does not work out. They will spell out what they will do if the cat has medical problems. They will offer support and advice if you encounter problems with your new cat.
                                     
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